Archive for July, 2014

Chest Article:

The report, presented by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), finds:

  • In 2010, the total national medical costs attributable to COPD were estimated at $32.1 billion dollars annually.
  • Absenteeism costs were $3.9 billion for a total burden of $36 billion in COPD-attributable costs.
  • An estimated 16.4 million days of work were lost due to COPD each year.
  • Of the medical cost, 18% was paid for by private insurance, 51% by Medicare, and 25% by Medicaid.
  • The study also projects a rise in medical costs from $32.1 billion in 2010 to $49 billion by 2020.

Results:  In 2010, total national medical costs attributable to COPD and its sequelae were estimated at $32.1 billion and total absenteeism costs were $3.9 billion for a total burden of COPD-attributable costs of $36 billion. An estimated 16.4 million days of work were lost because of COPD. Of the medical costs, 18% was paid for by private insurance, 51% by Medicare, and 25% by Medicaid. National medical costs are projected to increase from $32.1 billion in 2010 to $49.0 billion in 2020. Total state-specific costs in 2010 ranged from $49.1 million in Wyoming to $2.8 billion in California: medical costs ranged from $42.5 million in Alaska to $2.5 billion in Florida and absenteeism costs ranged from $8.4 million in Wyoming to $434.0 million in California.

Conclusion:  Costs attributable to COPD and its sequelae are substantial and are projected to increase through 2020. Evidence-based interventions that prevent tobacco use and reduce clinical complications of COPD may result in potential decreased COPD-attributable costs.

COPD-in-the-us-large

COPD COSTS

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QUOTE:

The objective of this video is to help guide respiratory professionals in the administration of the methacholine challenge test to diagnose bronchial hyperreactivity in subjects who do not have clinically apparent asthma. This video is intended to enhance your knowledge and proficiency of the methacholine challenge test according to the American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society recommendations. It is a dose-response test; therefore the delivery of the methacholine and measurement of the response must be accurate in order to produce valid test results. http://www.provocholine.com/resources.html

Bronchial-Provocation-Methacholine-FINAL-May-2010

 

More videos:

 

How to Quit Smoking

  • Why quitting seems so hard
  • Your personal stop smoking plan
  • Smoking triggers
  • Nicotine withdrawal
  • Cigarette cravings
  • Preventing weight gain
  • Medication and therapy
  • What to do if you relapse

Start your stop smoking plan with START

S = Set a quit date.

Choose a date within the next 2 weeks, so you have enough time to prepare without losing your motivation to quit. If you mainly smoke at work, quit on the weekend, so you have a few days to adjust to the change.

T = Tell family, friends, and co-workers that you plan to quit.

Let your friends and family in on your plan to quit smoking and tell them you need their support and encouragement to stop. Look for a quit buddy who wants to stop smoking as well. You can help each other get through the rough times.

A = Anticipate and plan for the challenges you’ll face while quitting.

Most people who begin smoking again do so within the first 3 months. You can help yourself make it through by preparing ahead for common challenges, such as nicotine withdrawal and cigarette cravings.

R = Remove cigarettes and other tobacco products from your home, car, and work.

Throw away all of your cigarettes (no emergency pack!), lighters, ashtrays, and matches. Wash your clothes and freshen up anything that smells like smoke. Shampoo your car, clean your drapes and carpet, and steam your furniture.

T = Talk to your doctor about getting help to quit.

Your doctor can prescribe medication to help with withdrawal and suggest other alternatives. If you can’t see a doctor, you can get many products over the counter at your local pharmacy or grocery store, including the nicotine patch, nicotine lozenges, and nicotine gum.

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-images-image31363174

 

DOWNLOAD PDF VERSION:

How to Quit Smoking: A Guide to Kicking the Habit for Good

quit-smoking-timeline

Asthma refresher for RN’s

pathology asthma

PowerPoint refresher Asthma:

AsthmaManagementUpdate

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