Archive for the ‘ HFOV ’ Category

Good one over on HFOV video

So you want to oscillate your patient, eh? Here’s a quick once-over.

******Disclaimer: The purpose of this video is a training refresher to RT’s. Any views or opinions presented in this video are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of MUSC or Sensormedics. ****

Thank you to:
Babak Sarani, MD
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Co-Director of the Rapid Response Team
Division of Traumatology and Surgical Critical Care
University of Pennsylvania

Despite advances in ventilator management, 31% to 38% of patients with adult respiratory distress syn- drome (ARDS) will die, some from progressive respira- tory failure. Inability to adequately oxygenate patients with severe ARDS has prompted extensive efforts to identify what are now known as alternative modes of ventilation including high-frequency oscillatory venti- lation and airway pressure release ventilation. Both modalities are based on the principles of the open-lung concept and aim to improve oxygenation by keeping the lung uniformly inflated for an extended period of time.

Copyright all rights reserved. Provided to BCRT.ca for educational purposes ONLY.

HFO_APRV published

Thank you to:
Babak Sarani, MD
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Co-Director of the Rapid Response Team
Division of Traumatology and Surgical Critical Care
University of Pennsylvania

Despite advances in ventilator management, 31% to 38% of patients with adult respiratory distress syn- drome (ARDS) will die, some from progressive respira- tory failure. Inability to adequately oxygenate patients with severe ARDS has prompted extensive efforts to identify what are now known as alternative modes of ventilation including high-frequency oscillatory venti- lation and airway pressure release ventilation. Both modalities are based on the principles of the open-lung concept and aim to improve oxygenation by keeping the lung uniformly inflated for an extended period of time.

Copyright all rights reserved. Provided to BCRT.ca for educational purposes ONLY.

HFO_APRV published

H.F.O.V. strategies

Below are links to H.F.O.V. literature to better understand this mode of ventilation:

img_0078

HFOV HISTORY

HFOV GAS TRANSPORT

ADULT HFOV

HFOV 3100B CONTROLS

HFOV CASE STUDY

VENTILATOR INDUCED LUNG INJURY

Pocket Guidelines (From Respiratory Resource)

Pocket Guidelines Peds (From Respiratory Resource)

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